John Bolson’s book, My Life in Vietnam, is a life-changing journey into a country of countless stories, characters and landscapes.

It is a story about his childhood in a remote village in the mountains, the Vietnam War, and how it changed him.

It tells the story of the first five years of his life, the hardships of his first year in the military, the lessons he learned and the legacy he leaves behind.

In the introduction, Bolton describes himself as a “lifeguard” but is not an active duty member of the U.S. Army.

He is a veteran of both the Korean War and the Vietnam conflict, and he has served in both the U:S.

and the South Vietnamese forces.

In his book, Bolson describes himself in a way that most people would consider a caricature, but it is a portrait that captures the essence of Bolson, a former soldier, journalist, and former president of the United States.

Bolson spent his early life in the U, growing up in a poor family in a village called Dong Khuang.

He was born in 1949 in a small village in what is now the province of Dong Khau.

Bolton says that his family was poor, and that their only income was the rice they grew in the fields.

The village was in the midst of a major military operation when his parents decided to leave and Bolson was the first child to go to school.

He says his parents were reluctant to give up their farm and their livelihood, and they made sure to bring their children with them when they returned.

“The only thing I wanted to do was to be able to go back to school,” Bolson said in a video he released.

But after five years in the Army, he was sent to the nearby village of Lao Phu, where he learned the ropes of a lifeguard.

“I got to know them from the outside,” he said.

“My first job was as a life guard.

I went to the water to clean it, then I went back to the field to take the water off the field.”

He was given a uniform, a hose and a bucket, and later learned how to operate the hose and bucket.

He eventually earned a salary as a field lifeguard, but he never earned enough to buy a house.

“For the first few years, I was living on a farm and I didn’t have any money,” Bolton said.

At age 21, Bolts family moved to the remote city of Lên Thứng, where Bolson lived for the next eight years. “Lên [Thịng] was a very poor city and you would go up and down the river and you’d see houses on the side of the road,” Bolts said.

He said he worked his way up the social ladder, eventually earning enough money to buy his own house.

In 1961, he and his wife moved to Vietnam.

“We had a lot of dreams,” Bolons son, Mark, told NPR.

“This was going to be a better country.”

The Bolts moved to Lêndan, the capital of Vietnam, in 1962, and Bolton worked his first job as a water taxi driver.

He then got a job in the local government office, and a job at the Lêng An Phộc village.

He earned enough money so that he could buy a small house in Lêon, and then a bigger house in nearby Thế and a third house in Saigon, which was not far from where he was living at the time.

The Bolons moved back to their hometown of Dong Kuang and the next year they bought a house in the village of Saigon.

“That’s where I started to really realize that life in Vietnam was not all that bad,” Bolan said.

It was only in 1969 that he was awarded a Purple Heart for his service in Vietnam.

He worked as a civilian lifeguard for four years and earned a degree in law.

“It was very difficult at first,” Bolstons son Mark said.

When he was 21, he became a volunteer at the city hall in Saigong, a city in the province in which Dong Khue is located.

He would go to meetings to find out who could get on the payroll.

“But I always thought it was a lot better than what I was getting paid,” Bolston said.

Mark Bolton’s wife, Karen, also served as a volunteer lifeguard in Saigo, where she is now living.

“In Saigouin, the people are so good,” Bolans son Mark told NPR, “and so we never had to worry about money, but there were times when I’d get paid and I would say, ‘Well, what about you?

What do you get paid?'”

When Mark Bolston became

Tags: